SENSE

Jayne McLucas FTV10009 SENSE Lost in a sea of sensations, both good and bad, the viewer must navigate to safety before being overwhelmed entirely by the information. SENSE is an exploration of visual and audio sensations that are uncomfortable but…

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Jayne McLucas
FTV10009

SENSE

Lost in a sea of sensations, both good and bad, the viewer must navigate to safety before being overwhelmed entirely by the information.

SENSE is an exploration of visual and audio sensations that are uncomfortable but unavoidable. It begins with a series of very distinct sensations – some good, some bad. As the film continues, the stimuli becomes increasingly upsetting to the viewer, with faster cuts and louder, more distorted noises. The intention is to overwhelm the viewer, to increase their stress levels enough that they feel not only uncomfortable or anxious, but physically nauseous.

Immersive, high quality audio in the vein of ASMR will be included to convince the viewer that they are the one performing the action on-screen, and they are the one who should be having the response to it.

SENSE has roots in the surrealist movement as it examines the body’s unconscious and automatic response to the world. It delves into an immersive, ASMR-inspired fog of sensory information and focuses on the viewer’s own visceral reaction. Filmed with a smartphone, SENSE is able to comment on moments that are rarely seen by a traditional camera, but can now be documented by the ever-present smartphone. This innovation adds a very natural, documentary-like aspect to the film, allowing the viewer to feel as if it is not a film at all, but rather, something they are physically experiencing. SENSE comments on a personal and emotional response to a lot of stimuli that is not often talked about openly.

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