Kendo Basics I: Getting Ready for Kendo Training

This “Kendo Basics I: Getting Ready for Kendo Training” gives you what you need to know in order for you to start training. It includes etiquette and manner, which is very important in kendo. Kendo carries Japanese cultural and historical…

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This “Kendo Basics I: Getting Ready for Kendo Training” gives you what you need to know in order for you to start training. It includes etiquette and manner, which is very important in kendo.

Kendo carries Japanese cultural and historical values and etiquette and manner are the most important part of kendo. Without them, we cannot call it kendo.

This video includes:
1. Introduction: Line-Up,
2. Sitting in Seiza,
3. Sitting in Seiza: Closer Look,
4. Sitting in Seiza with Bokutō,
5. Seiza & Mokusō,
6. Sitting Bow,
7. Beginning of Training at a Glance,
8. Finishing Up Training,
9. Finishing Up at a Glance,
10. How to Stand & Shizentai,
11. Standing Bow,
12. Taitō: Wearing Your Sword,
13. Nuketō: Drawing Out Your Sword and
14. Sonkyo.

Through this 36 minutes 47 seconds video, you are going to learn proper etiquette and manner, which you must follow when you learn kendo.

In “Kendo Basics II: Solo Movements”, you are going to learn the basic stance and footwork of kendo.

You can get the most out of the DVD together with the book, “Kendo Guide for Beginners” written by me, Masahiro Imafuji. I designed the book based on the video, so you can maximize your understandings of kendo basics.

About the creator: Masahiro “Hiro” Imafuji was born in 1973. He is the founder and representative of Kendo For Life, LLC and runs the website, Kendo-Guide.Com.

Hiro started kendo at the age of 7 at Shubukan in Itami City, Hyogo, Japan. Shubukan has more than 200 years of history and counted as one of the three greatest dojos in Japan. Shihan (the headmaster of the dojo) at that time was the late Juichi Tsurumaru sensei who graduated from Budo Senmon Gakko (a national school for training young men to teach kendo and other martial arts).

Hiro learned kendo from the late Tsurumaru sensei, the late Murayama sensei and Miyazaki sensei. After spending 6 years in New Zealand, where he instructed local kendoists, Hiro relocated to Guatemala, where he instructed Guatemalan kendoists between 2000 and 2002 as a full-time volunteer of Japan International Cooperation Agency and helped them to form an official kendo association.

Upon moving to the United States, he started instructing kendo at West Virginia University and assisted in the formation of a kendo club in 2005. Currently, he instructs at Mudokwan and Gotokukan Imafuji Dojo in Indianapolis, Indiana. He holds 6-dan Renshi in kendo.

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