How To Set Up A GPIO Screen For Raspberry Pi – Waveshare 3.5 Inch Touch LCD

All small GPIO screens for the Raspberry Pi go through a very similar process to set up. The Waveshare 3.5 Inch LCD 480×320 is the perfect example to demonstrate how. Full Article (including Additional Speed Tweaks) – https://core-electronics.com.au/tutorials/small-screens-raspberry-pi.html Related Information…

How To Set Up A GPIO Screen For Raspberry Pi - Waveshare 3.5 Inch Touch LCD

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All small GPIO screens for the Raspberry Pi go through a very similar process to set up. The Waveshare 3.5 Inch LCD 480×320 is the perfect example to demonstrate how.
Full Article (including Additional Speed Tweaks) – https://core-electronics.com.au/tutorials/small-screens-raspberry-pi.html

Related Information

Waveshare Wiki LCDs – https://www.waveshare.com/wiki/Main_Page#OLEDs_.2F_LCDs
Use Your Phone to Control Your Raspberry Pi – https://core-electronics.com.au/tutorials/raspcontrol-raspberry-pi.html
How To Setup Raspberry Pi Headless – https://core-electronics.com.au/tutorials/raspberry-pi-zerow-headless-wifi-setup.html

There is a whole range of Sub-4 Inch Displays that attach directly to the GPIO pins of Raspberry Pi Palm-Sized Computers. Many of them are touch devices and increase the usability of your Raspberry Pi whilst making almost no size sacrifices. For scenarios where a high frame rate is valuable/desired, such as playing retro games, whilst keeping the same form factor the display methods I would direct you to use is a IPS HDMI screen as you will get fantastic high FPS results straight away. The HDMI ports on the Raspberry Pi boards are very powerful and more effective at transferring video data than the GPIO pins. But for situations where you only desire a simple UI with touch then these small displays are perfect. The GPIO also offers a very rugged sturdy connection and together make for a compact nugget of practical computing power. The process will be done in this guide so that you do not need to access the Raspberry Pi headless. This is a much easier way to approach setting up a Raspberry Pi system with a GPIO display for beginners but you can definitely do this process remotely. If you want to squeeze out some extra performance from your screen by diving into the configuration files.

If you have any questions about this content or want to share a project you’re working on head over to our maker forum, we are full time makers and here to help – http://coreelec.io/forum

Core Electronics is located in the heart of Newcastle, Australia. We’re powered by makers, for makers. Drop by if you are looking for:

Waveshare 3.5 Inch LCD 480×320 (used here): https://core-electronics.com.au/catalog/product/view/sku/CE06726

IPS Waveshare 3.5 Inch LCD 480×320 (for Retro Gaming): https://core-electronics.com.au/catalog/product/view/sku/CE06727

Many Small Screens for Raspberry Pi: https://core-electronics.com.au/search/?q=raspberry+pi+display

Raspberry Pi Model B 2GB (used here): https://core-electronics.com.au/catalog/product/view/sku/CE06424

Raspberry Pi 4 Model B 8GB: https://core-electronics.com.au/catalog/product/view/sku/CE06974

Raspberry Pi 4 Power Supply: https://core-electronics.com.au/catalog/product/view/sku/CE06427

0:00 Intro
0:13 Overview of Sub 4-Inch Displays
1:15 What You Need
1:49 Assembly of Components
2:11 Power to the System and Configuration
2:37 Finding Terminal Commands
3:12 Show the GPIO Screen Terminal Commands
4:07 Rotate the Screen Terminal Commands
4:40 Get the Right Resolution
5:37 Calibrate Touch Screen
6:35 Outro

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