George Church Synthetic Biology Human Genome Project Super human

George Church | Synthetic Biology | Human Genome Project | Super human We should not fear ‘editing’ embryos to enhance human intelligence, says leading geneticist George Church for The Daily Telegraph, known online as The Telegraph, a national British daily…

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George Church | Synthetic Biology | Human Genome Project | Super human

We should not fear ‘editing’ embryos to enhance human intelligence, says leading geneticist George Church for The Daily Telegraph, known online as The Telegraph, a national British daily broadsheet newspaper published in London by Telegraph Media Group and distributed across the United Kingdom and internationally.

George Church told us why he’s listing Superhuman Gene Hacks. Hacking human genes is still a thing of the future, as proven the scandal involving CRISPR technology used on twin girls in utero. He Jiankui, a Chinese researcher, at the Human Genome Editing Conference in Hong Kong on Wednesday, November 28, 2018 claims to have made the world’s first gene-edited babies. Dr He Jiankui shocked the world when he reported — through a well-coordinated media campaign that involved an AP exclusive and YouTube videos — that he’d created the world’s first babies genetically edited with CRISPR: a set of twin girls, with a third CRISPR baby on the way.

George Church an American geneticist, molecular engineer, and chemist, he is the Robert Winthrop Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School, Professor of Health Sciences and Technology at Harvard University and MIT, and a founding member of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. As of March 2017, Church serves as a member of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists’ Board of Sponsors. George McDonald Church leads Synthetic Biology at the Wyss Institute, where he oversees the directed evolution of molecules, polymers, and whole genomes to create new tools with applications in regenerative medicine and bio-production of chemicals. Among his recent work at the Wyss is development of a technology for synthesizing whole genes, and engineering whole genomes, far faster, more accurate, and less costly than current methods. George is widely recognized for his innovative contributions to genomic science and his many pioneering contributions to chemistry and biomedicine. In 1984, he developed the first direct genomic sequencing method, which resulted in the first genome sequence (the human pathogen, H. pylori). He helped initiate the in 1984 and the Personal Genome Project in 2005. George Church invented the broadly applied concepts of molecular multiplexing and tags, homologous recombination methods, and array DNA synthesizers. His many innovations have been the basis for a number of companies including Editas ( Gene therapy ); Gen9bio ( Synthetic DNA ); and Veritas Genetics ( full human genome sequencing ). Prof. George McDonald Church is one of the most important scientist who implements science fiction ideas in real life. Church has received accolades including election to the National Academy of Sciences ( in 2011 ), and the National Academy of Engineering ( in 2012 ). He received the American Society for Microbiology Promega Biotechnology Research Award and the heptannual Bower Award and Prize for Achievement in Science of the Franklin Institute. He authored the NewScientist “top science book,” Regenesis ( on synthetic biology ) with Ed Regis. Church is a regular contributor to Edge.org and has appeared widely in the media, including TED venues, NOVA, Faces of America, Charlie Rose on PBS, The Colbert Report, and Xconomy. Other honors include the Triennial International Steven Hoogendijk Award in 2010 and the Scientific American Top 50 twice ( for “Designing artificial life” in 2005 and “The $1000 genome” in 2006 ). Newsweek picked Church for their 2008 “Power of Ideas” recognition in the category of Medicine ( for the Personal Genome Project ). In September 2010, Prof. Dr. George Church was honored for his work in genetics with the Mass High Tech All-Star Award. He is a member of the Research Advisory Board of SENS Research Foundation and co-founded 22 companies, co-authored 500 papers, has 143 patent publications, and is the author of Regenesis.

Following latest research at Harvard’s Wyss Institute, a machine learning tool could be key to the future of gene therapy delivery. Latest research from Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering along with the Harvard Medical School, led by Wyss Core Faculty member George Church, PhD, and his former postdoctoral fellow Eric Kelsic, PhD, aims to improve AAV delivery.
Eric Kelsic, PhD, is a Founder and CEO of Dyno Therapeutics, a VC-backed biotech located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dyno is leading a machine learning revolution to develop enhanced capsid proteins that enable new gene and genome editing therapies.

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